Cordyceps sinensis

Cordyceps sinensis

 

Cordyceps  is a rare species of plant widely used  in clinical medicine  Cordyceps  locally called as "Yarchagumba or Yarsagumba" which literally means summer plant –winter insect. It  has high commercial demand as tonic/aphrodisiac. Yarchagumba is a rare and unique herb that grows in the meadows above 3,500 meters (11,483 feet) in the Himalayan region of Nepal .

Medicinal Benefits :

- Yarchagumba  strengthens lung and kidneys, increases  energy and vitality, stops hemorrhage.

-  traditionally been used for impotence, increase sperm production and  increase blood production.  it used as  Natural Viagra.

-  used specifically for excess tiredness, chronic cough, asthma, debility, anemia and to build the bone marrow..

- Reduce triglycerides and cholesterol level, thus promoting cardiovascular heath.

- Improve sexual function in men and also combat infertality in women.

- Controls liver, lung and kidney dysfunction.

- Protects against  free radical damage and oxidative stress, thus slows down the effect of aging.

Chemical composition :

Research articles:

 

 

 

 

Botanical Name: Cordyceps sinensis


Common Name: Yaarsha Gumbaa, Jiwan buti


English Name: Cordycep, Caterpillar fungus


Parts Used: Fungus and insect larva


Habit and Habitat: Himalaya, China

 

Description: Fungus which comes out of the anterior end of a worm (caterpillar) during the monsoon period. The worm is seen living if the plant is  collected in early monsoon. To detect the fructification of the plant which comes out of the ground among the grasses one has to bent down to keepone's eye to the grass level and see around. The plant looks like a small spike of Ophioglossum with dark brown fructification and yellowish white stalk 5-8 cm long.


Uses: This species is highly esteemed aphrodisiac, tonic, cardiotonic and expectorant. Its extract is used to cure migraine and in blood pressure.


References: A compendium of Medicinal Plants in Nepal by Sushim Ranjan Baral and Puran Prasad Kurmi (October' 2006)